The Disabled Children’s Partnership (DCP) is a major coalition of more than 60 organisations, including BACD, campaigning for improved health and social care for disabled children, young people and their families.

The DCP exists to: address the lack of health and social care services; improve the quality of services available; make sure families can access those services; and ensure professionals communicate with each other and work together.

No End In Sight

On 12 May 2021, DCP published the findings of its latest survey on the impact of the pandemic of disabled children and their families.  The survey took place in the first half of April, so after schools had fully re-opened and as the country moved to the next stage of lockdown easing.  But despite this, and the government’s statements on prioritising services for disabled children, parent carers told us that many children and families are still missing the support they need.  Six in ten families are still experiencing delays to health appointments to review and treat long-term conditions; therapies are still delayed for half of children; and both children and parent carers are more socially isolated than the rest of the population.  You can read the report here.


“The Loneliest Lockdown”

On 29 March 2021, DCP published the findings of its second parent panel survey.  The report highlights how the pandemic has left disabled children and their families isolated, and the impact on the mental health of all members of the family.  Read more about our findings here.


“The Longest Lockdown”

In January, DCP asked its Parent Panel about the impact of the third lockdown – and the cumulative impact of the pandemic – on them and their families.  They told DCP of the devastating impact that this and the previous lockdowns were having.  Read more about it here– and DCP's call for a funded recovery and catch-up plan.


Families of disabled children call on the Government to #GiveItBack

The Disabled Children’s Partnership (DCP) and The Sun have joined forces to launch a powerful new campaign – Give It Back.

Disabled children and their families are missing out on vital care and support as a result of government cuts, the DCP has found. This is harming children and families’ physical and mental health, breaking parental relationships and causing children to needlessly miss out on school or college.

DCP research published last year revealed a £434 million funding gap for social care for disabled children and their families. This new campaign asks everyone to join DCP's call for the Government to Give It Back.


DCP survey shows a picture of declining quality of services and more cuts to come

On Thursday 28 June 2018, DCP published the results of its survey on the quality of health and social care services.   It asked families whether they thought the quality of health and social care services in their local area had got better or worse over the last few years.  It also asked whether they were aware of any specific plans to cut services in the future.  Thank you to everyone who took part the survey.  There was a really good response rate with over 1,500 surveys completed.

The picture painted by the survey is not a good one.  Three-quarters of family members said health services in their area had got worse; nearly two-thirds said the same for social care services; and just under half of respondents were aware of specific plans to cut services.  You can read the full report of the survey results here.


Secret Life of Us

The Secret Life of Us campaign was launched in June 2017, bringing to life the realities of the challenges disabled children, young people and their families face on a daily basis, in living a life many of us take for granted. This is because 43% of the British public don’t know anyone who is disabled and therefore are simply unaware of the challenges they encounter.

The DCP want to open the eyes of the public and improve awareness of the issues faced by families on a day-to-day basis; to remove the barriers to people being able to relate to the lives of disabled children; and create a greater understanding, affinity and empathy for them and their families.

British Academy of Childhood Disability is registered in England and Wales under charity number 1177868
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